Tuesday, March 31, 2015

The Ilocos Times March 30-April 5, 2015

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Legarda urges gov’t to shift to low-carbon economy

Senator Lorna Regina “Loren” B. Legarda urged the government to consider a long-term transition to a low-carbon economy, noting that investments in clean energy and low-carbon infrastructure will determine the future of our nation and the future generations.

Ms. Legarda, Chair of the Senate Committee on Climate Change, stressed that the idea of a low-carbon economy may seem ideal at first but if we look at the worsening effects of conventional energy sources such as fossil fuels to our health and environment, it should not be hard to understand the need to adopt the said concept.

Citing a study from the World Health Organization, Ms. Legarda said air pollution has caused seven million premature deaths worldwide in 2012. Moreover, she stressed that the traffic congestion in Metro Manila alone is costing us an equivalent of four percent of our GDP.

“We can start with building our cities in a smart way. Better connected, more compact cities based on mass public transport are economically more dynamic, safer and healthier, and have lower emissions,” Ms. Legarda said, citing the study, Better Growth, Better Climate: New Climate Economy Report.

She added, “The concept of road-sharing among pedestrians, cyclists and motorists should be adopted. The Bayanihan sa Daan movement we are supporting promotes a paradigm shift from the motor vehicle-based transportation system to a multi-modal system, wherein people are not dependent on their own motorized vehicles every time they go out, instead, they can choose different modes of transportation depending on their needs—walking or biking for short distances, and safe, reliable, inexpensive and convenient public transportation system for long distance trips”.

As a concrete strategy, Ms. Legarda said our government must encourage investments on renewable energy and ensure the sustainable use and management of our land and other natural resources as studies reveal that restoring 12% of the world’s degraded lands can already feed another 200 million people, raise farmers’ incomes by US$40 billion a year, and also cut emissions from deforestation.

Ms. Legarda is the author of the National Land Use Bill which seeks to provide a unified legal framework that will ensure a rational, holistic and just allocation, use and management of the country’s land resources.

Recently, the Philippine Senate, the British Embassy and the Chevening Alumni Foundation organized a roundtable discussion on the topic, “Is low carbon economy our future?”


The highlight of the forum was a presentation by Mr. Matt Nottingham of the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office about key findings of the study, Better Growth, Better Climate: New Climate Economy Report, which stresses the idea that there should be no tension between economic development and a low carbon economy. In fact, this paradigm shift could be the very answer to achieving high-quality, resilient and inclusive economic growth.

ASEAN integration and the legal profession

(Speech of Senate President Franklin M. Drilon on the 12th ASEAN Law Association General Assembly Delegates’ Luncheon in honor of ASEAN Chief
Justices and Heads of Delegation at the Makati Shangri-La Hotel on February 27, 2015)

I am deeply honored to be in the presence of esteemed justices, judges and lawyers in the ASEAN region. Whenever I am in a room full of lawyers, I am reminded of a question that was asked of me some time ago. The question goes, “What do you call one thousand lawyers tied together in the middle of an ocean?” The answer, “A good start.”
Levity aside, I am convinced that being in this room, in the presence of lawyers who are united in the ideal of ASEAN integration is, just like that old lawyer joke, a good start.

In the Philippines, the legal profession plays an important role in our nation’s growth. Lawyers are at the forefront of governance and business. It is not surprising that many Filipinos dream of becoming a lawyer. There are about 66 Thousand lawyers in the Philippines. Every year, about 6 Thousand take the Bar Examinations. Of this number, only about 20 to 30% succeed.

Yet, for all the power and glamor associated with the legal profession, there is a need to understand what being a lawyer truly means. This question is important in an era of globalization and integration. The traditional lawyer, who is used to dealing with legal issues within the four corners of his country, is being challenged to go beyond the borders of the legal framework that he is trained to navigate.

I have been a lawyer for more than four decades. I began my career as a private practitioner, together with Ed Angara and Ave Cruz, where I got to experience the work of a so-called traditional lawyer. I worked with clients to pursue and protect their interests. Through this, I learned that the legal profession is essential to the dreams and aspirations of people, whether they be interested in the development of their property, or the protection of their life and liberty.

I am fortunate to have been given the opportunity to serve the government in various capacities. As Secretary of Labor and Employment, I used my legal training to balance the interests of capital and labor. As Secretary of Justice, I instituted reforms in the criminal justice system. As Executive Secretary, I assisted the President in running the government and handled the administrative side of the law. 

I am also blessed to be able to serve as a senator, and now as Senate President. Here, I learned the importance of policy-making. That laws are intended to uplift the lives of people. That in order to craft laws that will create the conditions necessary for our people to live their dreams, it is in being a listener, more than a legal gladiator, that our goals are achieved.

Thus, it is my position that a lawyer should adopt the mentality of an arbitrator or mediator. I believe that the best mode for resolving conflicts is through dispute resolution, and not courtroom litigation. The procedure resolving conflicts, where the winner takes all, should pave the way for a method of harmonizing competing interests that aim to achieve a just solution. This approach is more consistent with the need to respect the agreement of parties, especially in commercial transactions.

Our duty is not to exacerbate conflict, but to avoid it. Our duty is not to find competing interests, but to find a space where interests can coexist. While competition is undoubtedly a catalyst for development, it is in cooperation that more can be accomplished. It is in this spirit of cooperation that I view our role as lawyers in ASEAN integration.

My dear friends, it is fair to say that this is the decade of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The ASEAN is increasingly the choice destination for investments in Asia. A list of 20 fastest growing economies in the world, recently released by Bloomberg, includes five member countries of the ASEAN.

Home to some 712 million people, with an increasingly highly-educated workforce; a nominal GDP of $2.4 trillion in 2013; and abundant natural resources, ASEAN has what it takes to become a formidable economic force in Asia.

ASEAN is at the heart of the Asia Pacific region. It is situated across major trade routes with $5.3 trillion in global trade passing through its waterways each year. Clearly, ASEAN is a driver of global economic growth.

In 2013, while the world’s GDP growth was at 3%. The ASEAN was at 4.9%. The Asian Development Bank estimates the bloc’s GDP growth at 5.6% in 2014, up from 5.3% in 2013. At current growth rates, it is predicted that ASEAN would become the fourth-largest market, after the EU, U.S. and China, by 2030.

Now is the time to cooperate to maximize the economic growth in our region. With our shared goal of expanding our economies, shared desire for excellence, and shared dream of providing a quality of life that is worthy of our people, the ASEAN region will become a force to be reckoned with in the international stage. Together, we are stronger.

Full ASEAN integration, however, poses a challenge to every ASEAN member country. The existing legal framework may not be sufficient for the region to achieve a completely free exchange of goods and services.

As part of our preparation for integration, we passed a law that would allow the Full Entry of Foreign Banks in the country. Foreign investors can now look to their trusted banks to facilitate transactions in our country. With this law, we encourage the inflow of foreign capital and other foreign direct investments, not only in the banking industry, but in other industries as well. With this law, we will see the Philippines ease into integrated financial and capital markets in our region.

We have started identifying areas where the current laws will not suffice. The Philippine Congress will shortly enact an anti-trust law, the Fair Competition Act. This proposed measure will have the effect of promoting economic efficiency in trade, industry and commerce through the prohibition of anti-competitive agreements, abuse of dominant position, and anti-competitive mergers. We will also pass legislation that will Allow Foreign Vessels to Transship Foreign Cargoes between Philippine Ports. This law will allow foreign vessels to call at multiple ports, and allow importers and exporters to co-load containers/cargoes in foreign ships going in and out of the Philippines. This will further open our market to competition, bring down transport costs by sea, and enable the country to fully utilize the supply chains for products. Next month, we will start the debate on the passage of a stronger enabling law for Public-Private Partnership (PPP) in order to provide the most appropriate framework to mobilize the private sector to finance, design, construct, operate and maintain infrastructure projects and services.

We also intend to establish institutions that would support our move towards liberalization. We will create two new offices: a Philippine Trade Representative Office, which will serve as the country’s central agency tasked to formulate a cohesive trade strategy and, second, a Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT), to support the development of our ICT systems, and put us at par with ASEAN economies which have cabinet level departments for information and communications technology.

ASEAN integration also poses a challenge to members of the legal profession. As the integration calls for a free exchange of resources, we must ask ourselves: what does integration mean to the legal profession? What is its impact to the practice of law? In this era of integration, the ASEAN lawyer must learn to navigate multiple legal jurisdictions.

In the Philippines, the practice of law right now is limited only to Filipinos. However, there are now efforts in our Supreme Court to liberalize the profession. There is a proposal to welcome foreign lawyers in the Philippines to assist their clients in international matters and cross border transactions. As a response to the need for the legal profession to be in tune with the ideal of ASEAN integration, the proposal for liberalization also allows for collaborative work between Filipino and foreign lawyers where the matter or transaction involves both domestic and foreign law. Further, the proposal also has a procedure for registration, whereby foreign lawyers and firms may be able to assist their clients in cross border transactions where the Philippines is involved. This proposal also requires foreign lawyers to live up to the standards and principles of lawyering in the Philippines, a practice that requires loyalty to the rule of law, and fidelity to the cause of the client. These are values that, I am certain, are shared by all lawyers in the ASEAN.

It is my hope that this move to liberalize the legal profession in the Philippines reaches fruition. I believe that this is a solid first step in making lawyers in the Philippines key players in the ASEAN integration.

While the practice of law in the ASEAN region may be a challenge, the liberalization of the legal profession will ultimately benefit the region as a whole. Cross border transactions will require businesses to be represented in several ASEAN countries to assist them as they move from one country to another. The liberalization of the practice of law will allow them to choose the lawyers who have a full grasp of their businesses or interests to represent them in cross border transactions. As the integration does away with the ideas of borders and barriers, the traditional concepts of forum in the creation and execution of transactions, are also being erased. This facilitates the ease in perfecting and executing contracts.

As lawyers, our duty is to create the kind of legal environment where integration and cross border transactions are possible and successful. If we are truly the builders of the infrastructure necessary for our clients to dream, and to see their dreams flourish, we have the duty to go beyond the four corners of our own country’s laws, and represent our clients, wherever they may be, to protect  their interests. This duty can be fulfilled not in the traditional mode where lawyers must cross swords and compete. Rather, it is only in cooperation that we will be able to become transnational lawyers.

Cooperation, I therefore submit, is the key to the liberalization of law practice.

The liberalization of the practice of law in the ASEAN benefits businesses and interests in the region. The long-term effect of a legal profession that recognizes no territorial boundaries goes into the success of the ASEAN integration itself.

The work of lawyers is linked to the growth of economies.

We are agents of development.

We are in the position to effect change.

We have the honor of becoming key players in the ASEAN integration.

We have the privilege of being instruments to the improvement of the lives of millions of people in the ASEAN region.

We are being called to go beyond the borders of our nations, and to create change in the grand scale.

We must, as lawyers, rise to the challenge.

The ASEAN Law Association must be a leading voice as we examine the impact of expanding markets, and enhanced globalization, on the laws in our respective countries.  It must be a proactive and constructive force to help sustain this era of strong economic growth, so that all member countries would reap the rewards of regional integration.

The ALA must be an active mouthpiece for the legal profession, as it brings to the courts, and to the legislatures, the major concerns of local and foreign businesses.

A major challenge for the ALA is to ensure that local economies continue to thrive and take advantage of the many benefits of increasingly bigger markets.  Moreover, with the same level of passion, ALA must ensure the observance of the rule of law in the entire ASEAN region. Lastly, ALA should be a leading voice in bridging the gaps in the ASEAN’s varied legal systems.

In this endeavor, being here today, to learn from each other and to build lasting ties, is indeed, a good start.        

We are on the verge of change.

It is an honor to witness it; to work for it; to live for it; with all of you.


Thank you very much for allowing me to share my thoughts on the ASEAN integration and the legal profession with all of you. Good afternoon.

Int’l Women’s Day 2015: Women farmers, key to fighting hunger

IFAD, WFP and FAO celebrate women’s contribution to food and nutrition security

 
Research suggests increasing women's access to agricultural resources would significantly improve food security worldwide.
Rome—Marking International Women’s Day 2015 on March 8th, leaders from the United Nations’ three Rome-based food agencies gathered to remind the world that women farmers play a central role in achieving food and nutrition security.

At the Rome event, leaders from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the World Food Programme (WFP) shared testimonials of their innovative interventions that have empowered rural women, and in doing so have contributed to food security and nutrition. They also highlighted that promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment can significantly strengthen efforts to reduce rural poverty.

This year’s event also marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995 (Beijing +20).

IFAD President Kanayo F. Nwanze delivered the opening keynote address pointing out that as men in developing countries migrate to urban centers or shift to better-paid work, a “feminization of agriculture” has occurred with approximately half of the agricultural workforce worldwide now made up of women.

"Women are the backbone of rural societies as they grow and process food and make sure their families are well-fed and well-nourished," Mr. Nwanze said.

"Too often, rural women are doing the backbreaking work. To improve women’s social and economic status, we need more recognition for the vital role they play in the rural economy.  Rural women need more opportunities to participate, improve their skills, gain access to assets, and be involved in agricultural production and marketing. Let us all work together to empower women to achieve food and nutrition security. For their sake, and the sake of their families and communities, he added."

Ertharin Cousin, the Executive Director of WFP, highlighted the innovative Purchase for Progress (P4P) initiative, which connects smallholders to markets and in five years tripled women’s participation in P4P-supported farmers’ organizations in 20 countries.

“Using WFP’s market power, the organization directly and positively impacted the lives of 300,000 women,” Cousin said. “By purchasing crops traditionally cultivated by women, such as beans and soya, WFP demonstrated the key role rural women play as we work together to achieve a world with zero hunger.  While acknowledging the success of this programme we must scale up the lessons learned to ensure greater opportunities for more women.”

Marcela Villarreal, Director of the Office for Partnerships, Advocacy and Capacity Development in FAO, stressed that food security overall would improve significantly if women were empowered with the same opportunities that men have, and sounded a warning about the position of rural women, in particular.

“While significant progress has been made in improving the lives of women since the Beijing conference, we’re concerned that rural women are lagging behind in every development indicator—both behind rural men and urban women,” Ms. Villarreal said. “In the 20 years since that conference, we have not achieved enough for this group of women who play an important role as food providers, and we need to step up our efforts to enable them to reach their full potential.”

Rural women have generally less access than men to productive resources and services. This gap imposes real costs on societies in terms of lost agricultural output, food security, and economic growth.

Events throughout the year to mark Beijing +20 provide an opportunity for the Rome-based UN agencies, the international community as a whole, and national governments to reflect on progress, flag remaining gaps, and renew their commitments to gender equality and women's empowerment. Despite the historic agreement of the Beijing Platform for Action by 189 governments in 1995, no country in the world has yet achieved gender equality. The gender pay gap is just one example of inequality that affects women worldwide.

Senate honors outstanding women

 
EMPOWERED WOMEN: Senators Pia Cayetano (sixth from left) and Cynthia Villar (fifth from left) lead the ribbon-cutting ceremony of an exhibit entitled 'Empowered Women: Raising the Bar,' at the Philippine Senate, Monday afternoon. The exhibit featured outstanding women known in the fields of sports, arts, entertainment, among others. Also in photo are (from left to right) Ann and Camille Meloto, Rachelle Gerodias, Olivia Bong Coo, Daphne Oseña Paez, Liza Macuja Elizalde and Senate Secretary Oscar Yabes.  (PRIB Photo by Albert Calvelo)
The Senate adopted a resolution on March 16 recognizing women for their valuable contributions to society in celebration of Women’s month this March and cited 14 women achievers and an all-woman mountaineering team.

Voting Resolution 1237, introduced by Senator Pia S. Cayetano, seeks to honor the economic, political and social achievements of Filipina women while calling for greater gender equality in the society.

“Women's Month is an opportune time to recognize outstanding women who continue to raise the bar and break the glass ceiling, not only in the country, but also across the world,” Ms. Cayetano said.

“It is important to continually acknowledge the role that women play towards nation building. The Senate is one with the country in celebrating Women’s Month by honoring outstanding and brilliant women from different walks of life who have been continuous achievers in different fields,” the resolution added.

The resolution said 14 women and a mountaineering team were recognized for their accomplishments in leadership, power and decision making. They are Lang Dulay, a famous T’boli dream weaver who is considered a national living treasure by the National Commission for Culture and Arts; Liza Macuja-Elizalde, acknowledged as the first Filipina prima ballerina; Rachelle Gerodias, the Philippines’ premier soprano; Monique Lhuillier, a world renowned fashion designer; Lolita Valderrama-Savage, a Pinay global artist; Fe del Mundo, a pediatrician and the first woman admitted to Harvard Medical School; Jurgenne Primavera, a marine scientist and a conservationist who is one of Time Magazine’s Heroes of the environment.

Also lauded by the resolution are Roselle Ambubuyog, the first visually-impaired Filipina to graduate Summa Cum Laude from Ateneo de Manila; Cristeta “Cris” Comerford, the first Asian and first female White House executive chef; Sheila Lirio Marcelo, the founder and CEO of care.com and named as a young global leader by the World Economic Forum; Anna and Camille Meloto, a social entrepreneur and founder of Human Nature, Inc. (Gandang Kalikasan); Daphne Oseña-Paez, the Unicef special advocate for children, tv host and blogger; Olivia Bong Coo, a four-time World Champion Bowler; Ani de Leon-Brown, the first Filipina to qualify in the Ironman Triathlon World Championships; and the first Filipina women to be part of the Mt. Everest team –Janet Belarmino, Carina Dayondon and Noelle Wenceslao.

Senate President Franklin M. Drilon said that the resolution was an expression of the upper chamber's recognition of women as equal partners in nation-building and driving reforms to Philippine society.

“We acknowledge the indispensable roles of Filipino women in advancing the nation. Their victories and achievements in their respective fields, sectors and responsibilities are that of the nation’s itself,” Mr. Drilon said.

Ilocos Norte dads blast 4.9MW solar project in Burgos

By Leilanie G. Adriano
Staff reporter

Laoag City—A 4.9 megawatt solar project of the Energy Development Corp. (EDC) in Burgos town, about 49 kilometers from Laoag City is ready for testing and commissioning anytime but members of the Ilocos Norte Sangguniang Panlalawigan refused to endorse it after EDC failed to seek the provincial government’s endorsement prior to its construction.

Under Provincial Ordinance No. 010-2014, project proponents and investors in Ilocos Norte are now required to sign a memorandum of agreement with the Ilocos Norte government, incorporating their specific plans and projects pertaining to corporate social responsibility (CSR).

This came out following the investment boom in the province yet there has been minimal returns felt by its host communities.

In accordance with Republic Act No. 9513, also known as the Renewable Energy Act of 2008, it states that all energy explorations, development, utilization and renewable energy systems or operations shall comply with existing environment regulations as prescribed by the DENR and other concerned government agencies.

Despite having secured a Certificate of Registration No. SESC 2014-07-088 issued by the Department of Energy, SP member Atty. Vicente Lazo said, “Endorsement should have been sought prior to its construction” as mandated by the CSR ordinance. 

On February 20, 2015, the EDC wrote a letter to the Sangguniang Panlalawigan requesting for the favorable endorsement of the solar project that is now 100 percent completed.

“This is a sign of disrespect, placing the cart before the horse,” Mr. Lazo lamented.

On March 9, 2015, the provincial board passed Resolution No. 2015-03-111 condemning the act of EDC in constructing and putting into operation its Burgos solar project without first securing endorsement from the Ilocos Norte government.

For his part, Reman Chua, project manager of the Burgos project said in an earlier committee hearing held at the Sangguniang Panlalawigan session hall on March 5 that the company sincerely apologized for its “misstep” and that the company recognized its failure to secure the SP endorsement.

The board has also questioned EDC’s construction of “overpriced” hand washing facilities last year as part of its corporate social responsibility in support of health and sanitation projects when EDC constructed its 150-MW wind power farm in the same town.

From January to June in 2014, the same firm had initially allotted P1.8 million for the construction of public toilets in at least 12 schools in Laoag City during the construction of its transmission lines connecting to the grid.

Aside from this, at least 25 out of the 55 toilets were also promised by the EDC to put up in 2014 and the remaining 35 shall be constructed in the coming years but until now, only a few were set up and some are already reported not functioning. Each hand washing facility costs P180, 000.


According to Mr. Chua, EDC has commissioned a contractor to construct the hand washing facilities to identified schools in the province. He assured they will look into the proper implementation of its CSR project.

Monday, March 30, 2015

INNHS gets 2 new classrooms

By Leilanie G. Adriano
Staff reporter

Laoag City—The Ilocos Norte National High School (INNHS) can now keep pace with the increasing number of enrollees each year as two classrooms were added to their school building.

The said classrooms were formally inaugurated on March 10 by local officials and students led by Ilocos Norte Governor Ma. Imelda “Imee” R. Marcos, Ilocos Norte Vice Governor Eugenio Angelo M. Barba and Laoag Mayor Chevylle V. Fariñas.

The new classrooms are the INNHS’ extension building along the Sirib Mile.

The construction of the classrooms was made possible through the counter-parting scheme between the Ilocos Norte government and the Dept. of Education (DepEd).

The same scheme is also being used to build more classrooms in the province to ease the shortage of classrooms.

With about P50 million allocated for classroom construction, at least 44 new classrooms in Paoay Lake National High School and in Paoay Central Elementary School will be constructed.

According to the DepEd, classroom shortage is still a perennial problem in the Philippine public school system as millions of new entrants enroll in public school each year.

The introduction of universal kindergarten in all public schools as part of the K+12 education reform program also resulted in a higher demand for classrooms across the country.

Earlier, the DepEd has signed a memorandum of agreement with the League of Cities, League of Municipalities and League of Provinces of the Philippines and the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) for the implementation of the classroom construction counter-parting program


As a general protocol, the DBM will assist the DepEd in identifying the appropriate funding sources under its budget and facilitate the release of allotment upon submission of required documents.

The need for conversion

THE season of Lent is a season of conversion. It is asking us for another conversion in an endless series of conversions which our life here on earth is meant for.

Lets never forget that we are on a journey toward our heavenly and eternal destination. We can only make progress and approach our goal every time we have a conversion.

Conversion is a necessity for us, since no matter how good we feel we are or how good we have been doing so far, we cannot deny the fact that deep in our heart there is always a fundamental choice we have to make every step of our life between good and evil, between God and us.

It is a choice, nay, a battle that can only be resolved and won if with God’s grace, we decide on another conversion, a change of heart, or at least a renewal, a purification, a strengthening of the heart that is constantly assailed by threats and dangers.

We should never take this fact of life for granted, even if we have to regard it also with a lot of naturalness, without making strange or outlandish efforts that can only aggravate instead of mitigate our predicament.

These days, with all the absorbing and entertaining distractions we have, and with all our tricks to cover up our mistakes, faults, sins, etc., it’s very easy to ignore this need for conversion.

But we should know how to handle these distractions. If handled well, these distractions can actually serve as aids, as reminders and spurs, rather than deterrents, to make another conversion.

In the first place, these distractions are unavoidable and also necessary for us to have some rest from our usual work. But if we hurdle the test of how to use them judiciously and prudently, not letting them to dominate us but rather using them for us to attain our proper goal, then they have a very positive value.

Thus, instead of desensitizing us in our relation with God and with others, these distractions can afford us rest that sharpens our piety and love for others. They become the very vehicles where we put to life what Christ himself said about where to find our rest: “Come to me...and I will give you rest.”

We should not allow our rest and recreation to be an activity that can only be pursued outside our relation with God and with others. That would be improper to us, and would expose us to a lot of dangers. Everything in our life, whether it is working or resting, should be done in the permanent context of loving God and others.

Precisely, the Lenten season, with its emphasis on self-denial, discipline, penance and purification, can help us to rein in the potential dangers of these distractions so we can put them in the proper conditions to help us love and serve God and others.

For this, conversion is necessary, since our wounded human condition tends to pursue our rest and recreation, our recourse to legitimate distractions as an exercise in pure self-indulgence and self-centeredness. In fact, the mainstream understanding of rest and recreation goes along this line.

It is this kind of mentality that can explain to a large extent why many people also often complain why they cannot seem to overcome some ugly personal falls like those sins of the flesh committed with one’s own self or with others. They seem incapable of resisting temptations.

Its precisely because they are imprisoned in their own world, they have been relying simply on their own resources that can only go so far, they have failed to go the source of truth, joy and strength.

Conversion is the path to take to have the necessary changes in our life. Let us imitate those characters in the gospel who, aware of their helplessness, went through some conversion by going back to God.

This is the example of the prodigal son who, after dissipating his inheritance and starting to suffer a lot of privations, came to his senses and decided to go back to his father who received him with great joy.

We need to humble ourselves to acknowledge our sinfulness and go to where we are assured not only of mercy but also of everything else that would put us back to our original dignity as children of God.


Conversion should be an active part of our vocabulary. We have to learn to feel the need for it just like we need air, water and food. God will always welcome us back!

Sense of continuity

WE need to build and strengthen our sense of continuity, now that we are in a world of multi-tasking, diverse concerns, disparate events, competing and even conflicting interests.

We need to know how to put them together as in a synergy, integrating them into one meaningful and somehow consistent and organic whole. It’s like weaving a fabric of different threads and producing a beautiful piece of cloth, or a seamless garment like that worn by Christ himself.
 
We also need to know how to move from thing to another, without getting stuck at a certain point, the previous phase, no matter how different from the succeeding one, actually preparing and launching us to the next.

This again is another challenge of our modern times. We cannot deny that many people today, especially the young, are floundering in this particular aspect of the today’s challenge.

They can appear to be doing and achieving many things, and yet they don’t get the corresponding reward of satisfaction. A paradoxical predicament besets them—they look filled with many things, and yet they feel empty. The more they do many different things, the more the urge to escape from them builds up.

They feel forced to do things, they feel used and prostituted. They can hardly relate what they are made to do to a bigger picture of things. And so they also become very prone to seek improper and harmful compensations, as in, recourse to drugs, drinks, sex, etc.

Others literally get sick, if not physically then, worse, mentally and emotionally. They feel their health, physical, mental and emotional, not to mention the most important, spiritual, ebbing way.

Incidence of cases in this area has increased drastically today. Young people especially, the most vulnerable sector since many of them are not actually prepared to take on the more subtle demands of their work, often fall into conditions approaching what is called a bipolar disorder.

They seem unable to control their high and low moments and tend to fall into violence either on themselves or on others. Actually they swing from one pole to another, from moments of hyperactivity and invasiveness to moments of indifference and apathy, from excitement to sadness.

All these observations only show the urgent need to develop a sense of continuity in our life and in all our activities and concerns. What should we do to face this challenge? What principles should be highlighted? What plans and programs can be made to tackle this challenge very realistically?

It’s good that, first of all, we raise the public consciousness of this issue, since most times, it is simply taken for granted, and often considered not very important and urgent.

And then we all need to realize more deeply that the basic and ultimate principle to help us build a sense of continuity is our vital union with God. As Creator who continues to govern us till end of time with his divine providence, God holds the law that contains the unity and continuity of everything in our life, including our mistakes and sins.

It is only through him, when we try to know his will at every moment, that we can achieve a sense of continuity since he is the one who governs everything and leads things to their proper goal.

Our main problem, which we should try to overcome, is that we tend to work simply on our own, just following our own will, our own plans, and relying simply on our natural powers. We should immediately dismiss this kind of thinking, for the simple reason that it simply does not hold water.

This will, of course, require a lot of humility, because we are all dominated by a deep-seated pride and vanity that can blind us from the objective reality of our total dependence on God, even as we also depend on ourselves completely.

From there, we should avail of a personal plan of life that contains certain acts of piety, spread throughout our day, our week, months and years that would keep alive our need for God.

This should include a time for prayer, continuing study of
the doctrine of our faith, recourse to the sacraments, never-ending
ascetical struggle to develop virtues and fighting against sin and
temptations, etc.
Very often during the day, we need to pause and ask ourselves: Is this what God is asking me to do at this moment? Is this how God is asking me to do?



And then, we should launch into an active apostolate, both personal and collective, so that this indispensable need for God is lived by all, and help us build a sense of continuity in our lives.

Ilocos Norte, Laoag City gov’ts organize ‘night express’

By Leilanie G. Adriano
Staff reporter

Laoag City—In preparation for the influx of tourist this summer, the Metro Ilocos Norte Council (MINC) was organized to cater to night commuters in at least four key destinations in the province.

The improvement of the public transport system was an offshoot of Ilocos Norte Governor Ma. Imelda “Imee” R.  Marcos’ State of the Province Address (SOPA) 2014 as she launched the Ilocos Norte 2020 vision to make the province the best little province in the country five years from now.

Part of this vision is to address the travel woes faced mostly by tourists including students who want to travel at night but without available public utility jeepneys and buses after 8 pm.

In a three-page memorandum of agreement signed by Ms. Marcos, Laoag City government administrator Cipriano Hilarion “Perry” Martinez III and the different transport organizations in the province, they agreed to introduce new routes or the provision of nigh express to serve passengers from 8pm to 1am from Laoag City all the way to Pagudpud every Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

The complete routes are: Laoag-Batac-Paoay, Laoag-Dingras, Laoag-Bacarra and Laoag–Pagudpud respectively.

Based on the agreement which will be on experimental basis from March 6 to August 31, 2015, standard fares will be collected from commuters and the central terminal will be at the Provincial Capitol west parking lot.

The transport groups will also guarantee the availability of trips per hour from 8 pm to 1 am.


Since the agreement is just “experimental” in nature, Ms. Marcos appealed to the public and those who may be affected by the proposed public transport system to understand the current situation and help instead the province to realize its vision to improve transportation services in key economic zones of Ilocos Norte.

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Dingras (Ilocos Norte) residents pay homage to St. Joseph

By Leilanie G. Adriano
Staff reporter

DINGRAS, Ilocos Norte—With a thankful heart, local residents here gathered in front of the heritage church of Saint Joseph, the town’s patron saint to celebrate his day of feast on March 19.

St. Joseph Church, known as one of the biggest in the country with a length of 90 feet and a width of 20 feet underwent a major facelift through a fundraising initiative initiated by Dingras’ local residents and other balikbayans [Ilocano immigrants] now based in Hawaii and mainland United States of America.

Seeing the transformation of the church, Dingras Mayor Erdio Valenzuela said the municipality is blessed to have its people helping transform the community into a peaceful and more progressive municipality in Ilocos Norte’s second district.

The feast day of St. Joseph, the husband of the Virgin Mary, every 19th day of March coincides with the town’s weeklong Ani [Harvest] festival, which is now on its 14th year.

Mr. Valenzuela and the officers and members of the Dingreños Association of Hawaii graced the re-opening of the church on the early morning of March 19 as one of the ten pilgrimage sites in the province.

With this year’s theme, “Sirib ken anus—gameng dagiti umili iti agtultuloy nga idudur-as ti Dingras [Knowledge and hard work, treasures of Dingras for continued progress]”, the Ani festival 2015 showcased a selection of agro-industrial and commercial trade, attended by balikbayans, guests and other visitors.

A grand parade featuring various stakeholders in Dingras was also staged and followed by the coronation of Miss Dingras 2015. 


Founded in 1598, this second class municipality is one of the oldest towns in Ilocos Norte formed by Spanish authorities. Although it is not the largest town in the province, Dingras, covering a land area of 17,962 hectares, has been acclaimed as the “rice granary” of Ilocos Norte mainly because it has been blessed with fertile fields, vast plains and abundant water supply. 

Notices for March 23, 2014

RA Form No. 10.1 (LCRO)
Republic of the Philippines
Local Civil Registry Office
Province of Ilocos Norte
Municipality of Sarrat

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
          In compliance with Section 5 of R.A. Act No. 9048, a notice is hereby served to the public that PACENCIA AGNI MIGUEL has filed with this Office a petition for change of first name from “OPILIA” to “OFELIA” in the birth certificate of OPILIA AGNI MIGUEL who was born on 18 January 1954 at Sarrat, Ilocos Norte and whose parents are Gil Miguel and Pacencia Agni.
          Any person adversely affected by said petition may file his written opposition with this Office not later than April 6, 2015.

(SGD) JOAN A. DUQUE
Municipal Civil Registrar
March 23-29, March 30-April 5, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

Publication Notice
RA 10172
Republic of the Philippines
Local Civil Registry Office
Province of Ilocos Norte
Municipality of Paoay

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
CCE-0013-2015     R.A. 10172                                                             March 18, 2015
          In compliance with the publication requirement and pursuant to OCRG Memorandum Circular No. 2013-1 Guidelines in the Implementation of the Administrative Order No. 1 Series of 2102 (IRR on R.A. 10172) Notice is hereby served to the public that BENEDICTO BARAOED TAROMA has filed with this Office a petition for Change of First Name from “BENNY” to “BENEDICTO” and correction of clerical error in the child’s date of birth from “8 18, 1955” to “AUGUST 5, 1955” in the Certificate of Live Birth of BENNY TAROMA, at Paoay, Ilocos Norte and whose parents are Constancio Taroma and Maria Baraoed.
          Any person adversely affected by said petition may file his written opposition with this Office not later than April 6, 2015.

(SGD) ROBERT M. GUIEB
Municipal Civil Registrar
March 23-29, March 30-April 5, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

R.A. 9048 Form No. 10.1 (LCRO)
Republic of the Philippines
Local Civil Registry Office
Province of Ilocos Norte
Municipality of Pasuquin

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
          In compliance with Section 5 of R.A. Act No. 9048, a notice is hereby served to the public that ERLINDA M. GALIZA has filed with this Office a petition for change of first name from “LINDA,NENITA” to “ERLINDA” in the birth certificate of LINDA,NENITA MADAMBA who was born on October 4, 1958 at Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte and whose parents are Vicente Madamba and Filipinas Udaundo.
          Any person adversely affected by said petition may file his written opposition with this Office not later than April 6, 2015.

(SGD) FELIZA C. RATUITA
Municipal Civil Registrar
March 23-29, March 30-April 5, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
REGIONAL TRIAL COURT
FIRST JUDICIAL REGION
BRANCH 17, BATAC CITY, ILOCOS NORTE

IN RE: PETITION FOR THE ANNULMENT/CANCELLATION OF THE RECORD OF BIRTH OF MARIVIC ULEP y CAJIMAT IN THE OFFICE OF THE LOCAL CIVIL REGISTRY (LCR) OF PAOAY, ILOCOS NORTE,

MARIVIC ULEP y CAJIMAT,
Petitioner,
-versus-
THE LOCAL CIVIL REGISTRAR OF PAOAY, ILOCOS NORTE, THE CIVIL REGISTRAR-GENERAL, NATIONAL STATISTICS OFFICE, QUEZON CITY AND ALL PERSONS WHO MAY OR HAVE ADVERSE INTEREST,
Respondents.

SP. PROC. NO. 5489-17
x- - - - - - - -x

O R D E R
          This is a verified Petition filed by petitioner Marivic Ulep y Cajimat through counsel, Atty. Mariegold A. Cabrales praying to the Court to direct the Local Civil Registrar of Paoay, Ilocos Norte and the National Statistics Office, Quezon City to cancel her birth records entered under Local Civil Registry of Paoay, Ilocos Norte appearing on page 0028 of book number 007, Registry No. 184.
          Finding the Petition to be sufficient in form and substance, the Court hereby set the initial hearing on APRIL 7, 2015 at 8:30 o’clock in the morning at the Session Hall of this Court located at the Hall of Justice, Batac City, Ilocos Norte, at which date, time and place, all interested parties may appear and show cause why the petition should not be granted.
          Let this Order be published at the expense of the petitioner once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the Province of Ilocos Norte and in the City of Laoag.
          Let copies of this Petition and this Order be furnished the Local Civil Registrar of Paoay, Ilocos Norte; the Civil Registrar General; the Prosecutor’s Office and the Solicitor General.
          The Branch Clerk of Court is hereby directed to furnish the Office of the Clerk of Court with a copy of this Order for its publication in accordance with the provisions of Presidential Decree No. 1079.
          SO ORDERED.
          Given in Chambers, this 2nd day of March, 2015 at Batac City, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.
(SGD) ANGELO M. ALBANO
Judge
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
REGIONAL TRIAL COURT
FIRST JUDICIAL REGION
BRANCH 19
Bangui, Ilocos Norte

GEMMA MARIE ALHAMA-AMI,
Petitioner,
-versus-
FROILAN R. AMI II,
Respondent.

SPEC. PROC. NO. 2553-19
x------------------------------x

S U M M O N S
(By Publication)
PETITION FOR SOLE CUSTODY
          PETITONER, through the undersigned counsel, and unto this Honorable Court, most respectfully alleges that:
1.      Petitioner is of legal age, married, Filipino citizen and resident of Brgy. San Lorenzo, Bangui, Ilocos Norte, while respondent is also of legal age, married, and also a resident of 42-S, Parinas St., Bahay Toro Project 8, Quezon City; where they may be served with summons and other court processes;
2.     Petitioner and respondent were married on September 10, 1999 before the Regional Trial Court, Branch 16, Laoag City, Ilocos Norte but the same marriage was annulled on December 23, 2008 which was granted by the Honorable Court of Bangui, Ilocos Norte under Civil Case No. 988-19 as evidenced by hereto attached Certificate of Marriage marked as Annex “A”, Court Decision for Nullity of Marriage marked as Annex “B” and Certificate of Finality marked as Annex “C”, respectively;
3.     As a fruit of their union, the parties begot two children named GERI MARRIELLE A. AMI, born on October 6, 1999 and FROILAN IMARX A. AMI III, born on November 20, 2003 as evidenced by hereto attached Certificates of Live Birth marked as Annex “D” and Annex “E”, respectively;
4.     During the subsistence of their marriage, petitioner became the breadwinner of the family while the respondent remained neglectful with his duties and responsibilities and remains as abusive spouse and a father.
5.     The respondent abandoned the petitioner and his two children. He never gave any financial support nor communicated to his family since then, hence, all the parental responsibilities were left on the shoulder of the petitioner;
6.     Thus, petitioner does not have any recourse than to file this instant action to take sole custody of said children since the respondent is no longer with his two children as indicated by acts of failing to provide financial support to his minor children for fifteen (15) years, his non-communication with them, his failure to visit his children even just for once, and his refusal to participate to fulfill his fatherly duties and obligations towards them.

WHEREFORE, premises considered it is most respectfully and humbly prayed of this Honorable Court that herein petition be GRANTED and the sole custody and parental authority be given to the petitioner
.
          Other reliefs, just and equitable under the premises are likewise prayed for.
          Respectfully submitted.
          November 15, 2014, Laoag City, for Bangui, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.

MICHAEL M. GARCES
Counsel for the Petitioner
Roll fo Attorneys No. 54898-4/30/2008
I.B.P. No. 938132-I.N. 1/3/14
P.T.R. No. 1542970-I.N. 1/13/14
MCLE Compliance No. IV-0006479, June 26, 2012
Address: Garces Law Office, Room 825, 80-888 Realty Building Gen. Luna cor. Balintawak Sts., 2900 Laoag City

  WHEREAS this Court in its Order dated March 16, 2015 issued an  Order directing the publication in a newspaper of general circulation the summons upon respondent FROILAN R. AMI II considering that respondent was not personally served summons and copy of the petition on the ground that respondent is no longer residing at the given address.
NOW THEREFORE, you respondent, FROILAN R. AMI II is hereby summoned through this medium of publication, and therefore required to file with the Office of the Clerk of Court, Regional Trial Court of Bangui, Ilocos Norte at Justice Hall, Bangui, Ilocos Norte, your answer to the above-entitled case within thirty(30) days from the date of the last publication hereof, serving at the same time a copy of your answer upon the petitioner’s counsel, Atty. Michael Garces, with office address at Garces Law Office, Rm 825, 80-888 Realty Bldg. Gen. Luna cor. Balintwak Sts., Laoag City.
Let this summons be published at the expense of the petitioner in a newspaper of general circulation once a week for two (2) consecutive weeks.
WITNESS THE HONORABLE ROSEMARIE V. RAMOS, Presiding Judge of this Court, this 19th day of March 2015 at Bangui, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.
(SGD) MARGIE GINES-LAROYA
Clerk of Court VI
March 23, 30, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH SALE
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late MARIA S. MARCOS and VENANCIO J. MARCOS consisting of forty-four (44) parcels of land designated as Lot Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ,14, 15 all of Psu-146393, and Lot Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 and 29 all of Psu-178684 covered by OCT Nos. P-1462 and P-1722 containing an area of 351 sq. m., 1,023 sq. m., 262 sq. m., 2,828 sq. m., 231 sq. m., 2,240 sq. m., 954 sq. m., 186 sq. m., 268 sq. m., 344 sq. m., 1,099 sq. m., 533 sq. m., 943 sq. m., 2,044 sq. m., 1,233 sq. m., 268 sq. m., 423 sq. m., 175 sq. m., 447 sq. m., 480 sq. m., 369 sq. m., 2,585 sq. m., 3,082 sq. m., 879 sq. m., 1,652 sq. m., 5,128 sq. m., 1,866 sq. m., 77 sq. m., 192 sq. m., 143 sq. m., 454 sq. m., 656 sq. m., 1,093 sq. m., 1,379 sq. m.,  1,485 sq. m., 1,456 sq. m., 145 sq. m., 119 sq. m., 1,285 sq. m., 1,206 sq. m., 1,535 sq. m., 438 sq. m., 685 sq. m. and 673 sq. m. all situated in Barrio of Lanas (now Baresbes), Municipality of Dingras, Ilocos Norte has been adjudicated by their heirs and simultaneously sold to Rodolfo B. Miranda the fifteen (15) above-described parcels of land designated as Lot No. 1 up to Lot No. 15 covered by OCT No. P-1462 and thirteen parcels of land designated as Lot Nos. 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15, 19, 25, 26, 27 and 29 covered by OCT No. P-1722 ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Francisco A. Musni as per Doc. No. 338; Page No. 68; Bk. No. LXX; S. of 2015.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH QUITCLAIM
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late FRANCISCO MANUEL GUERRERO consisting of a motor vehicle which is more particularly described as follows: Make- Honda; Chassis No. KB508030727; Model- 2007; Engine No. KB508E030730; Type- MC; Plate No. XJ1530; Color- Red and File No. 0124-00000072433 has been the subject of Deed of Adjudication with Quitclaim executed by his heirs in favor of Ma. Leda P. Guerrero ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Noel Domingo-Concepcion as per Doc. No. 127; Page No. 26; Bk. No. LIV; S. of 2014.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH CONSOLIDATION AND PARTITION
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late SPS. FILIPINAS S. BELARMINO and ISAAC BELARMINO consisting of three (3) parcels of land designated as Lot Nos. 13982, 14030 and 14269 all of Cad-398 under OCT Nos. P-19083, P-19084 and P-20397 containing an area of 728 sq. m., 1,027 sq. m. and 599 sq. m. all located at Brgy. Quiling Sur, Batac, Ilocos Norte has been the subject of Deed of Adjudication with Consolidation and Partition executed by their heirs ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Da Vinci M. Crisostomo as per Doc. No. 421; Page No. 86; Bk. No. CCXC; S. of 2014.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH QUITCLAIM
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late JOHN COOPER consisting of a parcel of land designated as Lot 4-E, PSD-01-085123, being a portion of Lot 4, PCS-01-00104089 under TCT No. 023-2013000091 containing an area of 250 sq. m. located at Brgy. Torre, Currimao, Ilocos Norte has been the subject of Adjudication with Quitclaim executed by his heir in favor of Apolinario A. Calacal ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Da Vinci M. Crisostomo as per Doc. No. 471; Page No. 96; Bk. No. CCXXXVI; S. of 2014.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

AFFIDAVIT OF RELEASE AND QUITCLAIM WITH INDEMNITY UNDERTAKING
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late SILVESTRE M. ANDRES consisting of a bank deposit with BANCO DE ORO UNIVERSAL BANK under S/A No. 105190074790 has been the subject of Affidavit of Release and Quitclaim with Indemnity Undertaking executed by his heir ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Emilio Edgar V. Doloroso Jr. as per Doc. No. 82; Page No. 17; Bk. No. XXVII; S. of 2013.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

AFFIDAVIT OF CLAIM WITH WAIVER OF RIGHTS
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the deceased depositor ROSALINA MENOR ALIPIO consisting of a bank deposits with PHILIPPINE NATIONAL BANK-LAOAG BRANCH under Savings Account No. 0044 329171 102 and Time Deposit No. 2018628 has been the subject of Affidavit of Claim with Waiver of Rights executed by his heirs in favor of Eleazar Tito M. ALipio ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Reynaldo A. Corpuz as per Doc. No. 224; Page No. 45; Bk. No. LXIX; S. of 2015.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH SALE
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late SERGIA CAMPOS consisting of a parcel of land designated as Lot No. 25054, Cad-195 (F-3-1-160) covered by OCT No. P-949 containing an area of 311 sq. m. situated in the Barrio of Sta. Angela (now Brgy. 10, San Jose), City of Laoag has been adjudicated by her heirs and simultaneously sold to Hari A. Apostol the entirety of the above-described parcel of land ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Francisco A. Musni as per Doc. No. 154; Page No. 31; Bk. No. LXXI; S. of 2015.
March 23, 30, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
REGIONAL TRIAL COURT
FIRST JUDICIAL REGION
BRANCH 19
Bangui, Ilocos Norte

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES,
Represented by the Department Of Energy (DOE)
Plaintiff,
-versus-
ANITA BULOSAN and the MUNICIPAL ASSESSOR OF PASUQUIN, ILOCOS NORTE,
Defendants.

CIVIL CASE NO. 2536-19
For: Expropriation
x------------------------------x

C O M P L A I N T
(Summons by Publication)

PLAINTIFF, by counsel, respectfully states:
2.     Plaintiff Republic of the Philippines, represented by the Department of Energy (DOE), is a sovereign political entity with the inherent power to expropriate private property for public use upon payment of just compensation.  It may be served with court processes through its statutory counsel, the Office of the Solicitor General (OSG), at 134 Amorsolo Street, Legaspi Village, Makati City.
3.     Private defendants, Anita Bulosan, is of legal age, Filipino and a resident of Barangay 30, Cadaratan, Bacarra, Ilocos Norte where she may be served with judicial processes.
4.     Public defendant Municipal Assessor of Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte, who is charged with the duty, inter alia, of maintaining a system for real property identification and accounting for taxation purposes - is impleaded as a nominal party.  She holds office in Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte, where she may be served with summons and other court processes;
5.     The 1987 Constitution recognizes the State’s paramount interest in improving the quality of life for all, which may be done by promoting industrialization that utilizes full and efficient use of human and natural resources.  If achieved, industrialization will significantly improve the delivery of goods and services produced by the nation.  Towards this end, the policy of the State is to give all sectors of the economy, including the private sector, optimum opportunity to develop the country’s natural resources;1
6.     Section 2, Article XII of the 1987 Constitution provides:
SEC. 2. All lands of the public domain, waters, minerals, coal, petroleum, and other mineral oils, all forces of potential energy, fisheries, forests or timber, wildlife, flora and fauna, and other natural resources are owned by the State.  With the exception of agricultural lands, all other natural resources shall not be alienated.  The exploration, development, and utilization of natural resources shall be under the full control and supervision of the State.  The State may directly undertake such activities, or it may enter into co-production, joint venture, or production-sharing agreements with Filipino citizens, or corporations or associations at least sixty per centum of whose capital is owned by such citizens [...]
7.     The National Government, through the DOE, endeavors to proactively involve the private sector in pursuing energy projects to meet the energy demands of an industrialized nation.  Specifically, Republic Act (R.A.) No. 91362 declares it a State policy to enhance the inflow of private capital and broaden the ownership base of the power generation, transmission and distribution sectors in order to minimize the financial risk exposure of the National Government.
8.     Under R.A. No. 7638,3 the DOE is required to “[f]ormulate policies for the planning and implementation of a comprehensive program for the efficient supply and economical use of energy consistent with the approved national economic plan and with the policies on environmental protection and conservation and maintenance of ecological balance[…].”
9.     To complement the mandate of the DOE, Executive Order (E.O.) No. 462, Series of 1997, was issued by then President Fidel V. Ramos to enable the private sector to participate in the exploration, development, utilization and commercialization of ocean, solar and wind energy resources for power and commercialization.
10.  The harnessing and utilization of renewable energy comprises a critical component of the government’s strategy to provide energy supply for the country.4 In this regard, the DOE has partnered with the Energy Development Corporation (EDC) to exploit wind energy resources for wide-scale use.
11.    Accordingly, the DOE in partnership with the EDC will undertake the Burgos Wind Project (BWP) under DOE Certificate of Registration No. WESC-2009-09-004.
12.  The BWP is a flagship project of the National Government that aims to promote energy security and sufficiency.  With the mounting demand for electricity, the BWP will generate and provide the entire Luzon and Visayas grids with “clean electricity” through the development, construction and operation of as much as fifty (50) wind turbines.  By harnessing wind in the generation of energy, the BWP will likewise displace as much as 124,901 tons of carbon dioxide, which will effectively curb greenhouse gas emissions.  The BWP will have a capacity of 86 megawatts (86 mw) and will cover an area of approximately six hundred hectares (600 Ha) across four (4) municipalities in the Province of Ilocos Norte.  Once completed, it will become the biggest wind farm in the Philippines.
13.  The BWP is a public necessity and of paramount national importance as it aims to achieve self-reliance in the country's energy requirements through the integrated and intensive development of its indigenous energy resources and through the judicious conservation, renewal and efficient utilization of energy to keep pace with the country's growing demand.
14.  The implementation of the BWP necessitates the immediate acquisition of properties within the City of Laoag and the Municipalities of Bacarra, Pasuquin and Burgos, Ilocos Norte.
15.  Private defendant claims an interest – based on Tax Declaration No. 08-0017-0011875- over Lot No. 40988, with an area of 756 square meters (sq. m.), more or less, situated in Brgy. 17, Ngabangab, Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte.
16.  Plaintiff seeks to expropriate a portion of the subject property, or the aggregate area of 305 sq. m., which will be needed as site6 for the implementation of the BWP.
17.  There is no permanent improvement constructed on the subject portion per the Certification7 issued by the Municipal Assessor of Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte.
18.  Plaintiff negotiated8 with private defendant for the acquisition of the exclusive right to occupy, possess, use and enjoy the subject property but private defendant declined and continues to decline the offer.
ARGUMENT IN SUPPORT OF THE PRAYER FOR THE ISSUANCE OF THE WRIT OF POSSESSION
19.  Being a flagship project of the National Government, the issuance of a writ of possession to facilitate plaintiff's immediate entry into the subject property to begin the construction of the BWP is of utmost urgency.
20.The prompt implementation of the BWP is significant as it will lessen the country's dependence on oil as a primary energy source. And as the BWP will generate “clean electricity”, it will at the same time address the pressing need for the government to take a more active role in protecting and preserving the environment.
21.  In Metropolitan Cebu Water District (MCWD) v. J. King and Sons Company, Inc.,9 the Supreme Court held that, upon compliance with the guidelines set forth in Section 4 of R.A. No. 8974, the issuance of a writ of possession is a ministerial duty:

R.A. No. 8974 provides a different scheme for the obtention of a writ of possession.  The law does not require a deposit with a government bank; instead it requires the government to immediately pay the property owner.  The provisional character of this payment means that it is not yet final, yet, sufficient under the law to entitle the Government to the writ of possession over the expropriated property.  The provisional payment is a prerequisite and a trigger for the issuance of the writ of possession.  In Gingoyon, we held that:
It is the plain intent of Rep. Act No. 8974 to supersede the system of deposit under Rule 67 with the scheme of “immediate payment” in cases involving national government infrastructure project.
xxx
Rep. Act No. 8974 is plainly clear in imposing the requirement of immediate prepayment, and no amount of statutory deconstruction can evade such requisite.  It enshrines a new approach towards eminent domain that reconciles the inherent unease attending expropriation proceedings with a position of fundamental equity. While expropriation proceedings have always demanded just compensation in exchange for private property, the previous deposit requirement impeded immediate compensation to the private owner, especially in cases wherein the determination of the final amount of compensation would prove highly disputed.  Under the new modality prescribed by Rep. Act No. 8974, the private owner sees immediate monetary recompense, with the same degree of speed as the taking of his/her property.
[…]
Petitioner was supposed to tender the provisional payment directly to respondent during a hearing which it had failed to attend.  Petitioner, then, deposited the provisional payment with the court.  The trial court did not commit an error in accepting the deposit and in issuing the writ of possession.  The deposit of the provisional amount with the court is equivalent to payment.
Indeed, Section 4 of R.A. No. 8974 is emphatic to the effect that “upon compliance with the guidelines...the court shall immediately issue to the implementing agency an order to take possession of the property and start the implementation of the project.”  Under this statutory provision, when the government, its agencies or government-owned and controlled corporations, make the required provisional payment, the trial court has a ministerial duty to issue a writ of possession.  In Capitol Steel Corporation v. PHIVIDEC Industrial Authority, we held that:
Upon compliance with the requirements, a petitioner in an expropriation case...is entitled to a writ of possession as a matter of right and it becomes the ministerial duty of the trial court to forthwith issue the writ of possession.  No hearing is required and the court neither exercises its discretion or judgment in determining the amount of the provisional value of the properties to be expropriated as the legislature has fixed the amount under Section 4 of R.A. No. 8974. (emphasis ours)
It is mandatory on the trial court's part to issue the writ of possession and on the sheriff's part to deliver possession of respondent's property to petitioner pursuant to the writ.
22. The subject property’s current zonal value10 is pegged by the BIR Revenue District Office (RDO) No. 1, Laoag City at PHP 50.00 per sq. m.
23. During the hearing, plaintiff will tender payment to private defendant in the total amount of 15,250.00, which is equivalent to one hundred percent (100%) of the subject portion’s value based on the current relevant zonal valuation.
24. Upon compliance with the requirements, particularly upon the deposit of the payment with the Honorable Court, plaintiff is entitled to the issuance of a writ of possession as a matter of right.
PRAYER
WHEREFORE, premises considered, it is respectfully prayed that the Honorable Court shall:
       i.            Upon tender of payment to private defendant, or upon its deposit with the Honorable Court- in case of her absence or refusal to accept - in an amount equivalent to one hundred percent (100%) of the subject’s portion value based on its current relevant zonal valuation, ISSUE a writ of possession authorizing plaintiff to take immediate possession, control, and disposition thereof.
     ii.            After due notice and hearing, ISSUE an order of expropriation declaring that plaintiff has a lawful and exclusive right to occupy, possess, use and enjoy the subject portion for the public purpose described above, upon payment of just compensation.
  iii.            Upon issuance of an order of expropriation, APPOINT three (3) competent and disinterested persons as commissioners to ascertain and report to the Honorable Court the just compensation to be paid for the subject portion; and
   iv.            After judgment of expropriation has been rendered, DIRECT public defendant to register the order of expropriation upon presentment and annotate a memorandum thereof on the pertinent tax declaration as a lien or encumbrance.
        Other forms of relief just and equitable are likewise prayed for.
Makati City for Municipality of Bangui, Ilocos Norte, March 27, 2014.
FRANCIS HARDELEZA
Solicitor General
Roll No. 25719
IBP Lifetime No. 00037, 1-18-93
MCLE Exemption No. III-8523

(SGD) THOMAS M. LARAGAN
Assistant Solicitor General
Roll No. 38842
IBP Lifetime No. 09144, 04/29/10
MCLE Exemption No. IV-000051,

MARIA VICTORIA V. SARDILLO
State Solicitor
Roll No. 477226
IBP Lifetime No. 07223
MCLE Compliance No. IV-0018739

OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL
134 Amorsolo Street, Legaspi Village
Makati City
Tel. Nos. 813-0086

WHEREAS this Court in its Order dated March 10, 2015 issued an  Order directing the publication in a newspaper of general circulation the summons considering that the return of the summons to the respondent was not properly serve on the ground that respondent is presently outside the country.
NOW THEREFORE, you defendant, Anita Bulosan as owner of Lot 40988 is hereby summoned through this medium of publication, and therefore required to file with the Office of the Clerk of Court, Regional Trial Court of Bangui, Ilocos Norte at Justice Hall, Bangui, Ilocos Norte, your answer to the above-entitled case within sixty (60) days from the date of the last publication hereof, serving at the same time a copy of your answer upon the plaintiff’s counsels, Atty. Francis H. Jardeleza, Atty. Thomas M. Laragan and Atty. Maria Victoria V. Sardillo with office address at OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL, 134 Amorsolo St., Legaspi Village, Makati City.
Let this summons be published at the expense of the petitioner in a newspaper of general circulation once a week for two (2) consecutive weeks.
WITNESS THE HONORABLE ROSEMARIE V. RAMOS, Presiding Judge of this Court, this 19th day of March 2015 at Bangui, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.
(SGD) MARGIE GINES-LAROYA
Clerk of Court VI
_____________________
1Section 1, Article XII (National Economy and Patrimony) of the 1987 Constitution provides:
          SEC. 1. The goals of the national economy are a more equitable distribution of opportunities, income, and wealth; a sustained increase in the amount of goods and services produced by the nation for the benefit of the people; and an expanding productivity as the key to raising the quality of life for all, especially the underprivileged.
          The State shall promote industrialization and full employment based on sound agricultural development and agrarian reform, through industries that make full and efficient use of human and natural resources, and which are competitive in both domestic and foreign markets. However, the State shall protect Filipino enterprises against unfair foreign competitions and trade practices.
          In the pursuit of these goals, all sectors of the economy and all regions of the country shall be given optimum opportunity to develop. Private enterprises, including corporations, cooperatives and similar collective organizations, shall be encourage to broaden the base of their ownership.
2Otherwise known as the “Electric Power Industry Reform Act of 2001”.
3Otherwise known as the “Department of Energy Act of 1992”
4http://www.doe.gov.ph/ER/Renergy.htm (accessed on December 6, 2010)
5Annex “A”.
6Annex “B”
7Annex “C”.
8Annex “D”
9GR No. 175983, April 16, 2009, 585 SCRA 485
10Annex “E”
March 23, 30, 2015*IT

_________________________________________________________Notices for March 23, 2014

RA Form No. 10.1 (LCRO)
Republic of the Philippines
Local Civil Registry Office
Province of Ilocos Norte
Municipality of Sarrat

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
          In compliance with Section 5 of R.A. Act No. 9048, a notice is hereby served to the public that PACENCIA AGNI MIGUEL has filed with this Office a petition for change of first name from “OPILIA” to “OFELIA” in the birth certificate of OPILIA AGNI MIGUEL who was born on 18 January 1954 at Sarrat, Ilocos Norte and whose parents are Gil Miguel and Pacencia Agni.
          Any person adversely affected by said petition may file his written opposition with this Office not later than April 6, 2015.

(SGD) JOAN A. DUQUE
Municipal Civil Registrar
March 23-29, March 30-April 5, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

Publication Notice
RA 10172
Republic of the Philippines
Local Civil Registry Office
Province of Ilocos Norte
Municipality of Paoay

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
CCE-0013-2015     R.A. 10172                                                             March 18, 2015
          In compliance with the publication requirement and pursuant to OCRG Memorandum Circular No. 2013-1 Guidelines in the Implementation of the Administrative Order No. 1 Series of 2102 (IRR on R.A. 10172) Notice is hereby served to the public that BENEDICTO BARAOED TAROMA has filed with this Office a petition for Change of First Name from “BENNY” to “BENEDICTO” and correction of clerical error in the child’s date of birth from “8 18, 1955” to “AUGUST 5, 1955” in the Certificate of Live Birth of BENNY TAROMA, at Paoay, Ilocos Norte and whose parents are Constancio Taroma and Maria Baraoed.
          Any person adversely affected by said petition may file his written opposition with this Office not later than April 6, 2015.

(SGD) ROBERT M. GUIEB
Municipal Civil Registrar
March 23-29, March 30-April 5, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

R.A. 9048 Form No. 10.1 (LCRO)
Republic of the Philippines
Local Civil Registry Office
Province of Ilocos Norte
Municipality of Pasuquin

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION
          In compliance with Section 5 of R.A. Act No. 9048, a notice is hereby served to the public that ERLINDA M. GALIZA has filed with this Office a petition for change of first name from “LINDA,NENITA” to “ERLINDA” in the birth certificate of LINDA,NENITA MADAMBA who was born on October 4, 1958 at Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte and whose parents are Vicente Madamba and Filipinas Udaundo.
          Any person adversely affected by said petition may file his written opposition with this Office not later than April 6, 2015.

(SGD) FELIZA C. RATUITA
Municipal Civil Registrar
March 23-29, March 30-April 5, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
REGIONAL TRIAL COURT
FIRST JUDICIAL REGION
BRANCH 17, BATAC CITY, ILOCOS NORTE

IN RE: PETITION FOR THE ANNULMENT/CANCELLATION OF THE RECORD OF BIRTH OF MARIVIC ULEP y CAJIMAT IN THE OFFICE OF THE LOCAL CIVIL REGISTRY (LCR) OF PAOAY, ILOCOS NORTE,

MARIVIC ULEP y CAJIMAT,
Petitioner,
-versus-
THE LOCAL CIVIL REGISTRAR OF PAOAY, ILOCOS NORTE, THE CIVIL REGISTRAR-GENERAL, NATIONAL STATISTICS OFFICE, QUEZON CITY AND ALL PERSONS WHO MAY OR HAVE ADVERSE INTEREST,
Respondents.

SP. PROC. NO. 5489-17
x- - - - - - - -x

O R D E R
          This is a verified Petition filed by petitioner Marivic Ulep y Cajimat through counsel, Atty. Mariegold A. Cabrales praying to the Court to direct the Local Civil Registrar of Paoay, Ilocos Norte and the National Statistics Office, Quezon City to cancel her birth records entered under Local Civil Registry of Paoay, Ilocos Norte appearing on page 0028 of book number 007, Registry No. 184.
          Finding the Petition to be sufficient in form and substance, the Court hereby set the initial hearing on APRIL 7, 2015 at 8:30 o’clock in the morning at the Session Hall of this Court located at the Hall of Justice, Batac City, Ilocos Norte, at which date, time and place, all interested parties may appear and show cause why the petition should not be granted.
          Let this Order be published at the expense of the petitioner once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation in the Province of Ilocos Norte and in the City of Laoag.
          Let copies of this Petition and this Order be furnished the Local Civil Registrar of Paoay, Ilocos Norte; the Civil Registrar General; the Prosecutor’s Office and the Solicitor General.
          The Branch Clerk of Court is hereby directed to furnish the Office of the Clerk of Court with a copy of this Order for its publication in accordance with the provisions of Presidential Decree No. 1079.
          SO ORDERED.
          Given in Chambers, this 2nd day of March, 2015 at Batac City, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.
(SGD) ANGELO M. ALBANO
Judge
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
REGIONAL TRIAL COURT
FIRST JUDICIAL REGION
BRANCH 19
Bangui, Ilocos Norte

GEMMA MARIE ALHAMA-AMI,
Petitioner,
-versus-
FROILAN R. AMI II,
Respondent.

SPEC. PROC. NO. 2553-19
x------------------------------x

S U M M O N S
(By Publication)
PETITION FOR SOLE CUSTODY
          PETITONER, through the undersigned counsel, and unto this Honorable Court, most respectfully alleges that:
1.      Petitioner is of legal age, married, Filipino citizen and resident of Brgy. San Lorenzo, Bangui, Ilocos Norte, while respondent is also of legal age, married, and also a resident of 42-S, Parinas St., Bahay Toro Project 8, Quezon City; where they may be served with summons and other court processes;
2.     Petitioner and respondent were married on September 10, 1999 before the Regional Trial Court, Branch 16, Laoag City, Ilocos Norte but the same marriage was annulled on December 23, 2008 which was granted by the Honorable Court of Bangui, Ilocos Norte under Civil Case No. 988-19 as evidenced by hereto attached Certificate of Marriage marked as Annex “A”, Court Decision for Nullity of Marriage marked as Annex “B” and Certificate of Finality marked as Annex “C”, respectively;
3.     As a fruit of their union, the parties begot two children named GERI MARRIELLE A. AMI, born on October 6, 1999 and FROILAN IMARX A. AMI III, born on November 20, 2003 as evidenced by hereto attached Certificates of Live Birth marked as Annex “D” and Annex “E”, respectively;
4.     During the subsistence of their marriage, petitioner became the breadwinner of the family while the respondent remained neglectful with his duties and responsibilities and remains as abusive spouse and a father.
5.     The respondent abandoned the petitioner and his two children. He never gave any financial support nor communicated to his family since then, hence, all the parental responsibilities were left on the shoulder of the petitioner;
6.     Thus, petitioner does not have any recourse than to file this instant action to take sole custody of said children since the respondent is no longer with his two children as indicated by acts of failing to provide financial support to his minor children for fifteen (15) years, his non-communication with them, his failure to visit his children even just for once, and his refusal to participate to fulfill his fatherly duties and obligations towards them.

WHEREFORE, premises considered it is most respectfully and humbly prayed of this Honorable Court that herein petition be GRANTED and the sole custody and parental authority be given to the petitioner
.
          Other reliefs, just and equitable under the premises are likewise prayed for.
          Respectfully submitted.
          November 15, 2014, Laoag City, for Bangui, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.

MICHAEL M. GARCES
Counsel for the Petitioner
Roll fo Attorneys No. 54898-4/30/2008
I.B.P. No. 938132-I.N. 1/3/14
P.T.R. No. 1542970-I.N. 1/13/14
MCLE Compliance No. IV-0006479, June 26, 2012
Address: Garces Law Office, Room 825, 80-888 Realty Building Gen. Luna cor. Balintawak Sts., 2900 Laoag City

  WHEREAS this Court in its Order dated March 16, 2015 issued an  Order directing the publication in a newspaper of general circulation the summons upon respondent FROILAN R. AMI II considering that respondent was not personally served summons and copy of the petition on the ground that respondent is no longer residing at the given address.
NOW THEREFORE, you respondent, FROILAN R. AMI II is hereby summoned through this medium of publication, and therefore required to file with the Office of the Clerk of Court, Regional Trial Court of Bangui, Ilocos Norte at Justice Hall, Bangui, Ilocos Norte, your answer to the above-entitled case within thirty(30) days from the date of the last publication hereof, serving at the same time a copy of your answer upon the petitioner’s counsel, Atty. Michael Garces, with office address at Garces Law Office, Rm 825, 80-888 Realty Bldg. Gen. Luna cor. Balintwak Sts., Laoag City.
Let this summons be published at the expense of the petitioner in a newspaper of general circulation once a week for two (2) consecutive weeks.
WITNESS THE HONORABLE ROSEMARIE V. RAMOS, Presiding Judge of this Court, this 19th day of March 2015 at Bangui, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.
(SGD) MARGIE GINES-LAROYA
Clerk of Court VI
March 23, 30, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH SALE
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late MARIA S. MARCOS and VENANCIO J. MARCOS consisting of forty-four (44) parcels of land designated as Lot Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 ,14, 15 all of Psu-146393, and Lot Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 and 29 all of Psu-178684 covered by OCT Nos. P-1462 and P-1722 containing an area of 351 sq. m., 1,023 sq. m., 262 sq. m., 2,828 sq. m., 231 sq. m., 2,240 sq. m., 954 sq. m., 186 sq. m., 268 sq. m., 344 sq. m., 1,099 sq. m., 533 sq. m., 943 sq. m., 2,044 sq. m., 1,233 sq. m., 268 sq. m., 423 sq. m., 175 sq. m., 447 sq. m., 480 sq. m., 369 sq. m., 2,585 sq. m., 3,082 sq. m., 879 sq. m., 1,652 sq. m., 5,128 sq. m., 1,866 sq. m., 77 sq. m., 192 sq. m., 143 sq. m., 454 sq. m., 656 sq. m., 1,093 sq. m., 1,379 sq. m.,  1,485 sq. m., 1,456 sq. m., 145 sq. m., 119 sq. m., 1,285 sq. m., 1,206 sq. m., 1,535 sq. m., 438 sq. m., 685 sq. m. and 673 sq. m. all situated in Barrio of Lanas (now Baresbes), Municipality of Dingras, Ilocos Norte has been adjudicated by their heirs and simultaneously sold to Rodolfo B. Miranda the fifteen (15) above-described parcels of land designated as Lot No. 1 up to Lot No. 15 covered by OCT No. P-1462 and thirteen parcels of land designated as Lot Nos. 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15, 19, 25, 26, 27 and 29 covered by OCT No. P-1722 ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Francisco A. Musni as per Doc. No. 338; Page No. 68; Bk. No. LXX; S. of 2015.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH QUITCLAIM
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late FRANCISCO MANUEL GUERRERO consisting of a motor vehicle which is more particularly described as follows: Make- Honda; Chassis No. KB508030727; Model- 2007; Engine No. KB508E030730; Type- MC; Plate No. XJ1530; Color- Red and File No. 0124-00000072433 has been the subject of Deed of Adjudication with Quitclaim executed by his heirs in favor of Ma. Leda P. Guerrero ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Noel Domingo-Concepcion as per Doc. No. 127; Page No. 26; Bk. No. LIV; S. of 2014.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH CONSOLIDATION AND PARTITION
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late SPS. FILIPINAS S. BELARMINO and ISAAC BELARMINO consisting of three (3) parcels of land designated as Lot Nos. 13982, 14030 and 14269 all of Cad-398 under OCT Nos. P-19083, P-19084 and P-20397 containing an area of 728 sq. m., 1,027 sq. m. and 599 sq. m. all located at Brgy. Quiling Sur, Batac, Ilocos Norte has been the subject of Deed of Adjudication with Consolidation and Partition executed by their heirs ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Da Vinci M. Crisostomo as per Doc. No. 421; Page No. 86; Bk. No. CCXC; S. of 2014.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH QUITCLAIM
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late JOHN COOPER consisting of a parcel of land designated as Lot 4-E, PSD-01-085123, being a portion of Lot 4, PCS-01-00104089 under TCT No. 023-2013000091 containing an area of 250 sq. m. located at Brgy. Torre, Currimao, Ilocos Norte has been the subject of Adjudication with Quitclaim executed by his heir in favor of Apolinario A. Calacal ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Da Vinci M. Crisostomo as per Doc. No. 471; Page No. 96; Bk. No. CCXXXVI; S. of 2014.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

AFFIDAVIT OF RELEASE AND QUITCLAIM WITH INDEMNITY UNDERTAKING
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late SILVESTRE M. ANDRES consisting of a bank deposit with BANCO DE ORO UNIVERSAL BANK under S/A No. 105190074790 has been the subject of Affidavit of Release and Quitclaim with Indemnity Undertaking executed by his heir ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Emilio Edgar V. Doloroso Jr. as per Doc. No. 82; Page No. 17; Bk. No. XXVII; S. of 2013.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

AFFIDAVIT OF CLAIM WITH WAIVER OF RIGHTS
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the deceased depositor ROSALINA MENOR ALIPIO consisting of a bank deposits with PHILIPPINE NATIONAL BANK-LAOAG BRANCH under Savings Account No. 0044 329171 102 and Time Deposit No. 2018628 has been the subject of Affidavit of Claim with Waiver of Rights executed by his heirs in favor of Eleazar Tito M. ALipio ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Reynaldo A. Corpuz as per Doc. No. 224; Page No. 45; Bk. No. LXIX; S. of 2015.
March 23, 30, April 6, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________________

DEED OF ADJUDICATION WITH SALE
          Notice is hereby given that the intestate estate of the late SERGIA CAMPOS consisting of a parcel of land designated as Lot No. 25054, Cad-195 (F-3-1-160) covered by OCT No. P-949 containing an area of 311 sq. m. situated in the Barrio of Sta. Angela (now Brgy. 10, San Jose), City of Laoag has been adjudicated by her heirs and simultaneously sold to Hari A. Apostol the entirety of the above-described parcel of land ratified and acknowledged before Notary Public Francisco A. Musni as per Doc. No. 154; Page No. 31; Bk. No. LXXI; S. of 2015.
March 23, 30, 2015*IT
_________________________________________________

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
REGIONAL TRIAL COURT
FIRST JUDICIAL REGION
BRANCH 19
Bangui, Ilocos Norte

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES,
Represented by the Department Of Energy (DOE)
Plaintiff,
-versus-
ANITA BULOSAN and the MUNICIPAL ASSESSOR OF PASUQUIN, ILOCOS NORTE,
Defendants.

CIVIL CASE NO. 2536-19
For: Expropriation
x------------------------------x

C O M P L A I N T
(Summons by Publication)

PLAINTIFF, by counsel, respectfully states:
2.     Plaintiff Republic of the Philippines, represented by the Department of Energy (DOE), is a sovereign political entity with the inherent power to expropriate private property for public use upon payment of just compensation.  It may be served with court processes through its statutory counsel, the Office of the Solicitor General (OSG), at 134 Amorsolo Street, Legaspi Village, Makati City.
3.     Private defendants, Anita Bulosan, is of legal age, Filipino and a resident of Barangay 30, Cadaratan, Bacarra, Ilocos Norte where she may be served with judicial processes.
4.     Public defendant Municipal Assessor of Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte, who is charged with the duty, inter alia, of maintaining a system for real property identification and accounting for taxation purposes - is impleaded as a nominal party.  She holds office in Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte, where she may be served with summons and other court processes;
5.     The 1987 Constitution recognizes the State’s paramount interest in improving the quality of life for all, which may be done by promoting industrialization that utilizes full and efficient use of human and natural resources.  If achieved, industrialization will significantly improve the delivery of goods and services produced by the nation.  Towards this end, the policy of the State is to give all sectors of the economy, including the private sector, optimum opportunity to develop the country’s natural resources;1
6.     Section 2, Article XII of the 1987 Constitution provides:
SEC. 2. All lands of the public domain, waters, minerals, coal, petroleum, and other mineral oils, all forces of potential energy, fisheries, forests or timber, wildlife, flora and fauna, and other natural resources are owned by the State.  With the exception of agricultural lands, all other natural resources shall not be alienated.  The exploration, development, and utilization of natural resources shall be under the full control and supervision of the State.  The State may directly undertake such activities, or it may enter into co-production, joint venture, or production-sharing agreements with Filipino citizens, or corporations or associations at least sixty per centum of whose capital is owned by such citizens [...]
7.     The National Government, through the DOE, endeavors to proactively involve the private sector in pursuing energy projects to meet the energy demands of an industrialized nation.  Specifically, Republic Act (R.A.) No. 91362 declares it a State policy to enhance the inflow of private capital and broaden the ownership base of the power generation, transmission and distribution sectors in order to minimize the financial risk exposure of the National Government.
8.     Under R.A. No. 7638,3 the DOE is required to “[f]ormulate policies for the planning and implementation of a comprehensive program for the efficient supply and economical use of energy consistent with the approved national economic plan and with the policies on environmental protection and conservation and maintenance of ecological balance[…].”
9.     To complement the mandate of the DOE, Executive Order (E.O.) No. 462, Series of 1997, was issued by then President Fidel V. Ramos to enable the private sector to participate in the exploration, development, utilization and commercialization of ocean, solar and wind energy resources for power and commercialization.
10.  The harnessing and utilization of renewable energy comprises a critical component of the government’s strategy to provide energy supply for the country.4 In this regard, the DOE has partnered with the Energy Development Corporation (EDC) to exploit wind energy resources for wide-scale use.
11.    Accordingly, the DOE in partnership with the EDC will undertake the Burgos Wind Project (BWP) under DOE Certificate of Registration No. WESC-2009-09-004.
12.  The BWP is a flagship project of the National Government that aims to promote energy security and sufficiency.  With the mounting demand for electricity, the BWP will generate and provide the entire Luzon and Visayas grids with “clean electricity” through the development, construction and operation of as much as fifty (50) wind turbines.  By harnessing wind in the generation of energy, the BWP will likewise displace as much as 124,901 tons of carbon dioxide, which will effectively curb greenhouse gas emissions.  The BWP will have a capacity of 86 megawatts (86 mw) and will cover an area of approximately six hundred hectares (600 Ha) across four (4) municipalities in the Province of Ilocos Norte.  Once completed, it will become the biggest wind farm in the Philippines.
13.  The BWP is a public necessity and of paramount national importance as it aims to achieve self-reliance in the country's energy requirements through the integrated and intensive development of its indigenous energy resources and through the judicious conservation, renewal and efficient utilization of energy to keep pace with the country's growing demand.
14.  The implementation of the BWP necessitates the immediate acquisition of properties within the City of Laoag and the Municipalities of Bacarra, Pasuquin and Burgos, Ilocos Norte.
15.  Private defendant claims an interest – based on Tax Declaration No. 08-0017-0011875- over Lot No. 40988, with an area of 756 square meters (sq. m.), more or less, situated in Brgy. 17, Ngabangab, Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte.
16.  Plaintiff seeks to expropriate a portion of the subject property, or the aggregate area of 305 sq. m., which will be needed as site6 for the implementation of the BWP.
17.  There is no permanent improvement constructed on the subject portion per the Certification7 issued by the Municipal Assessor of Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte.
18.  Plaintiff negotiated8 with private defendant for the acquisition of the exclusive right to occupy, possess, use and enjoy the subject property but private defendant declined and continues to decline the offer.
ARGUMENT IN SUPPORT OF THE PRAYER FOR THE ISSUANCE OF THE WRIT OF POSSESSION
19.  Being a flagship project of the National Government, the issuance of a writ of possession to facilitate plaintiff's immediate entry into the subject property to begin the construction of the BWP is of utmost urgency.
20.The prompt implementation of the BWP is significant as it will lessen the country's dependence on oil as a primary energy source. And as the BWP will generate “clean electricity”, it will at the same time address the pressing need for the government to take a more active role in protecting and preserving the environment.
21.  In Metropolitan Cebu Water District (MCWD) v. J. King and Sons Company, Inc.,9 the Supreme Court held that, upon compliance with the guidelines set forth in Section 4 of R.A. No. 8974, the issuance of a writ of possession is a ministerial duty:

R.A. No. 8974 provides a different scheme for the obtention of a writ of possession.  The law does not require a deposit with a government bank; instead it requires the government to immediately pay the property owner.  The provisional character of this payment means that it is not yet final, yet, sufficient under the law to entitle the Government to the writ of possession over the expropriated property.  The provisional payment is a prerequisite and a trigger for the issuance of the writ of possession.  In Gingoyon, we held that:
It is the plain intent of Rep. Act No. 8974 to supersede the system of deposit under Rule 67 with the scheme of “immediate payment” in cases involving national government infrastructure project.
xxx
Rep. Act No. 8974 is plainly clear in imposing the requirement of immediate prepayment, and no amount of statutory deconstruction can evade such requisite.  It enshrines a new approach towards eminent domain that reconciles the inherent unease attending expropriation proceedings with a position of fundamental equity. While expropriation proceedings have always demanded just compensation in exchange for private property, the previous deposit requirement impeded immediate compensation to the private owner, especially in cases wherein the determination of the final amount of compensation would prove highly disputed.  Under the new modality prescribed by Rep. Act No. 8974, the private owner sees immediate monetary recompense, with the same degree of speed as the taking of his/her property.
[…]
Petitioner was supposed to tender the provisional payment directly to respondent during a hearing which it had failed to attend.  Petitioner, then, deposited the provisional payment with the court.  The trial court did not commit an error in accepting the deposit and in issuing the writ of possession.  The deposit of the provisional amount with the court is equivalent to payment.
Indeed, Section 4 of R.A. No. 8974 is emphatic to the effect that “upon compliance with the guidelines...the court shall immediately issue to the implementing agency an order to take possession of the property and start the implementation of the project.”  Under this statutory provision, when the government, its agencies or government-owned and controlled corporations, make the required provisional payment, the trial court has a ministerial duty to issue a writ of possession.  In Capitol Steel Corporation v. PHIVIDEC Industrial Authority, we held that:
Upon compliance with the requirements, a petitioner in an expropriation case...is entitled to a writ of possession as a matter of right and it becomes the ministerial duty of the trial court to forthwith issue the writ of possession.  No hearing is required and the court neither exercises its discretion or judgment in determining the amount of the provisional value of the properties to be expropriated as the legislature has fixed the amount under Section 4 of R.A. No. 8974. (emphasis ours)
It is mandatory on the trial court's part to issue the writ of possession and on the sheriff's part to deliver possession of respondent's property to petitioner pursuant to the writ.
22. The subject property’s current zonal value10 is pegged by the BIR Revenue District Office (RDO) No. 1, Laoag City at PHP 50.00 per sq. m.
23. During the hearing, plaintiff will tender payment to private defendant in the total amount of 15,250.00, which is equivalent to one hundred percent (100%) of the subject portion’s value based on the current relevant zonal valuation.
24. Upon compliance with the requirements, particularly upon the deposit of the payment with the Honorable Court, plaintiff is entitled to the issuance of a writ of possession as a matter of right.
PRAYER
WHEREFORE, premises considered, it is respectfully prayed that the Honorable Court shall:
       i.            Upon tender of payment to private defendant, or upon its deposit with the Honorable Court- in case of her absence or refusal to accept - in an amount equivalent to one hundred percent (100%) of the subject’s portion value based on its current relevant zonal valuation, ISSUE a writ of possession authorizing plaintiff to take immediate possession, control, and disposition thereof.
     ii.            After due notice and hearing, ISSUE an order of expropriation declaring that plaintiff has a lawful and exclusive right to occupy, possess, use and enjoy the subject portion for the public purpose described above, upon payment of just compensation.
  iii.            Upon issuance of an order of expropriation, APPOINT three (3) competent and disinterested persons as commissioners to ascertain and report to the Honorable Court the just compensation to be paid for the subject portion; and
   iv.            After judgment of expropriation has been rendered, DIRECT public defendant to register the order of expropriation upon presentment and annotate a memorandum thereof on the pertinent tax declaration as a lien or encumbrance.
        Other forms of relief just and equitable are likewise prayed for.
Makati City for Municipality of Bangui, Ilocos Norte, March 27, 2014.
FRANCIS HARDELEZA
Solicitor General
Roll No. 25719
IBP Lifetime No. 00037, 1-18-93
MCLE Exemption No. III-8523

(SGD) THOMAS M. LARAGAN
Assistant Solicitor General
Roll No. 38842
IBP Lifetime No. 09144, 04/29/10
MCLE Exemption No. IV-000051,

MARIA VICTORIA V. SARDILLO
State Solicitor
Roll No. 477226
IBP Lifetime No. 07223
MCLE Compliance No. IV-0018739

OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL
134 Amorsolo Street, Legaspi Village
Makati City
Tel. Nos. 813-0086

WHEREAS this Court in its Order dated March 10, 2015 issued an  Order directing the publication in a newspaper of general circulation the summons considering that the return of the summons to the respondent was not properly serve on the ground that respondent is presently outside the country.
NOW THEREFORE, you defendant, Anita Bulosan as owner of Lot 40988 is hereby summoned through this medium of publication, and therefore required to file with the Office of the Clerk of Court, Regional Trial Court of Bangui, Ilocos Norte at Justice Hall, Bangui, Ilocos Norte, your answer to the above-entitled case within sixty (60) days from the date of the last publication hereof, serving at the same time a copy of your answer upon the plaintiff’s counsels, Atty. Francis H. Jardeleza, Atty. Thomas M. Laragan and Atty. Maria Victoria V. Sardillo with office address at OFFICE OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL, 134 Amorsolo St., Legaspi Village, Makati City.
Let this summons be published at the expense of the petitioner in a newspaper of general circulation once a week for two (2) consecutive weeks.
WITNESS THE HONORABLE ROSEMARIE V. RAMOS, Presiding Judge of this Court, this 19th day of March 2015 at Bangui, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.
(SGD) MARGIE GINES-LAROYA
Clerk of Court VI
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1Section 1, Article XII (National Economy and Patrimony) of the 1987 Constitution provides:
          SEC. 1. The goals of the national economy are a more equitable distribution of opportunities, income, and wealth; a sustained increase in the amount of goods and services produced by the nation for the benefit of the people; and an expanding productivity as the key to raising the quality of life for all, especially the underprivileged.
          The State shall promote industrialization and full employment based on sound agricultural development and agrarian reform, through industries that make full and efficient use of human and natural resources, and which are competitive in both domestic and foreign markets. However, the State shall protect Filipino enterprises against unfair foreign competitions and trade practices.
          In the pursuit of these goals, all sectors of the economy and all regions of the country shall be given optimum opportunity to develop. Private enterprises, including corporations, cooperatives and similar collective organizations, shall be encourage to broaden the base of their ownership.
2Otherwise known as the “Electric Power Industry Reform Act of 2001”.
3Otherwise known as the “Department of Energy Act of 1992”
4http://www.doe.gov.ph/ER/Renergy.htm (accessed on December 6, 2010)
5Annex “A”.
6Annex “B”
7Annex “C”.
8Annex “D”
9GR No. 175983, April 16, 2009, 585 SCRA 485
10Annex “E”
March 23, 30, 2015*IT
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